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Το περιεχόμενο παρέχεται από το Judy Croon. Όλο το περιεχόμενο podcast, συμπεριλαμβανομένων των επεισοδίων, των γραφικών και των περιγραφών podcast, μεταφορτώνεται και παρέχεται απευθείας από τον Judy Croon ή τον συνεργάτη της πλατφόρμας podcast. Εάν πιστεύετε ότι κάποιος χρησιμοποιεί το έργο σας που προστατεύεται από πνευματικά δικαιώματα χωρίς την άδειά σας, μπορείτε να ακολουθήσετε τη διαδικασία που περιγράφεται εδώ https://el.player.fm/legal.
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Laugh Long & Prosper -Live To 100: Secrets of The Blue Zones

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Manage episode 396752616 series 1052974
Το περιεχόμενο παρέχεται από το Judy Croon. Όλο το περιεχόμενο podcast, συμπεριλαμβανομένων των επεισοδίων, των γραφικών και των περιγραφών podcast, μεταφορτώνεται και παρέχεται απευθείας από τον Judy Croon ή τον συνεργάτη της πλατφόρμας podcast. Εάν πιστεύετε ότι κάποιος χρησιμοποιεί το έργο σας που προστατεύεται από πνευματικά δικαιώματα χωρίς την άδειά σας, μπορείτε να ακολουθήσετε τη διαδικασία που περιγράφεται εδώ https://el.player.fm/legal.
I’m Judy Croon. Canada’s Keynote Humourist Welcome to another episode of Laugh Long and Prosper. Documentary Review - Live to 100: Secrets of The Blue Zones This is a great documentary to kick off the new year. In this compelling 90-minute Netflix movie, author and National Geographic explorer Dan Buettner shares fascinating information about the Blue Zones, five areas in the world where, per capita, there are the most residents who are living to 100 years-old or longer! The Blue Zones are located in Sardinia (Italy), Ikaria (Greece), Nicoya (Costa Rica), Loma Linda (California) and, topping the list with the highest number of centenarians per capita in the world, Okinawa (Japan). Host Dan Buettner, who has studied the Blue Zones for over 10 years with doctors, demographers and psychologists, tries to uncover the secrets to longevity in these parts of the world. It’s worth noting that presently, according to the CDC (the Centre for Disease Control) the average American is living until they are 78 years-old. However, research shows that the human body has an excellent chance of making it to 90 years-old, if taken care of properly. So how do we get back 12 years? How do we protect ourselves from chronic diseases, heart disease and diabetes? It’s also worth noting another study outside of this documentary that was done in Denmark, involving 2500 Danish twins. The study revealed that genetics only determine about 20 percent of our longevity. Our lifestyle determines the other 80 percent! So, what can the Blue Zones teach us? First of all, if you’re hoping for one easy fix, there isn’t one. Secrets of the Blue Zones proposes that the key to aging well is a combination of lifelong practices - a series of daily fixes if you will. What’s hopeful about this documentary is that there are lots of takeaways that people living outside of the Blue Zones can use. Buettner says it boils down to 9 pieces. Number One: Moving Naturally (without effort) No gym memberships here. Blue Zone centenarians move without having to think about it. They build natural movement into their daily routines. It could be as simple as sitting. The women of Okinawa don’t sit on chairs - they sit on the floor! This means having to get up at least 30 or 40 times a day. Many Okinawan centenarians also garden at least one hour a day. In Sardinia, Italy many of the centenarians are or were shepherds. This means that they easily clock at least 6 miles a day walking up and down hills with their flocks. It doesn’t get easier when they go home. The town itself has many hills and stairs. Many narrow houses are built with multiple level staircases. Number Two: Purpose A recent study showed that more Americans die in their first year of retirement than in their last year of work. People in the Blue Zones do not have any specific year for retirement. They always keep busy. Perhaps the centenarians of Okinawa, Japan say it best when it comes to purpose. They have a word for purpose. It’s called Ikigai. Ikigai means’ a reason for being’ - a reason for getting out of bed every morning. But Ikigai doesn’t have to be complicated. One resident who is a karate master at 102 years- old says his Ikigai is to continue his martial arts practice. Another Okinawa centenarian says his Ikigai is catching three fish a week so he can feed his family. (Cont)
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205 επεισόδια

Artwork
iconΜοίρασέ το
 
Manage episode 396752616 series 1052974
Το περιεχόμενο παρέχεται από το Judy Croon. Όλο το περιεχόμενο podcast, συμπεριλαμβανομένων των επεισοδίων, των γραφικών και των περιγραφών podcast, μεταφορτώνεται και παρέχεται απευθείας από τον Judy Croon ή τον συνεργάτη της πλατφόρμας podcast. Εάν πιστεύετε ότι κάποιος χρησιμοποιεί το έργο σας που προστατεύεται από πνευματικά δικαιώματα χωρίς την άδειά σας, μπορείτε να ακολουθήσετε τη διαδικασία που περιγράφεται εδώ https://el.player.fm/legal.
I’m Judy Croon. Canada’s Keynote Humourist Welcome to another episode of Laugh Long and Prosper. Documentary Review - Live to 100: Secrets of The Blue Zones This is a great documentary to kick off the new year. In this compelling 90-minute Netflix movie, author and National Geographic explorer Dan Buettner shares fascinating information about the Blue Zones, five areas in the world where, per capita, there are the most residents who are living to 100 years-old or longer! The Blue Zones are located in Sardinia (Italy), Ikaria (Greece), Nicoya (Costa Rica), Loma Linda (California) and, topping the list with the highest number of centenarians per capita in the world, Okinawa (Japan). Host Dan Buettner, who has studied the Blue Zones for over 10 years with doctors, demographers and psychologists, tries to uncover the secrets to longevity in these parts of the world. It’s worth noting that presently, according to the CDC (the Centre for Disease Control) the average American is living until they are 78 years-old. However, research shows that the human body has an excellent chance of making it to 90 years-old, if taken care of properly. So how do we get back 12 years? How do we protect ourselves from chronic diseases, heart disease and diabetes? It’s also worth noting another study outside of this documentary that was done in Denmark, involving 2500 Danish twins. The study revealed that genetics only determine about 20 percent of our longevity. Our lifestyle determines the other 80 percent! So, what can the Blue Zones teach us? First of all, if you’re hoping for one easy fix, there isn’t one. Secrets of the Blue Zones proposes that the key to aging well is a combination of lifelong practices - a series of daily fixes if you will. What’s hopeful about this documentary is that there are lots of takeaways that people living outside of the Blue Zones can use. Buettner says it boils down to 9 pieces. Number One: Moving Naturally (without effort) No gym memberships here. Blue Zone centenarians move without having to think about it. They build natural movement into their daily routines. It could be as simple as sitting. The women of Okinawa don’t sit on chairs - they sit on the floor! This means having to get up at least 30 or 40 times a day. Many Okinawan centenarians also garden at least one hour a day. In Sardinia, Italy many of the centenarians are or were shepherds. This means that they easily clock at least 6 miles a day walking up and down hills with their flocks. It doesn’t get easier when they go home. The town itself has many hills and stairs. Many narrow houses are built with multiple level staircases. Number Two: Purpose A recent study showed that more Americans die in their first year of retirement than in their last year of work. People in the Blue Zones do not have any specific year for retirement. They always keep busy. Perhaps the centenarians of Okinawa, Japan say it best when it comes to purpose. They have a word for purpose. It’s called Ikigai. Ikigai means’ a reason for being’ - a reason for getting out of bed every morning. But Ikigai doesn’t have to be complicated. One resident who is a karate master at 102 years- old says his Ikigai is to continue his martial arts practice. Another Okinawa centenarian says his Ikigai is catching three fish a week so he can feed his family. (Cont)
  continue reading

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