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The Sommelier

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Connectors of taste, Sommeliers are more than experts at pairing great wine and food. Hear from the wine, beer and spirit storytellers we entrust to guide us towards a discovery of things we never knew we loved. On The Sommelier Podcast.
 
Welcome to the Kosher Sommelier! This podcast aims to elevate, inform, and entertain wine lovers from casual drinkers to connoisseurs, with a focus on the kosher market. Hosted by Andrew Breskin, we are going to focus on getting to know some notable players in the kosher wine space, such as winemakers, wine critics, and movers and shakers in the business of wine. We will also be leveraging Andrew’s extensive network in the broader wine world to have some meaningful conversations with some gr ...
 
The Alcohol-Free Sommelier is a fortnightly look at the world of No & Low alcohol drinks, hosted by Christine Parkinson. Meet the people who create, serve, sell and drink them. Find out the latest news on technology and ingredients, history, market trends and legal issues and of course, the drinks on the shelves right now. If it’s non-alcoholic, it’s here!
 
Un espacio para recordar a quienes que con sus sueños nos permitieron ser mejores. Tambien para encontrarnos con los sueños de quienes nos acompañan cerca, todos los dias. Todo ello revivido en las secciones de Historias para hacer Memoria, las Historias Cotidianas y Danos el vino de cada dia. En Sommelier de Sueños, tenemos vinos y sueños para desgustar.
 
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North America's Rocky Mountain Trench, also known as the Valley of a Thousand Peaks, is a large valley on the western side of the northern part of North America's Rocky Mountains. This massive rift valley stretches all the way from the British Columbia-Yukon border south to the St. Ignatius area and can be seen from space.…
 
We sometimes find fossils preserved by pyrite. They are prized as much for their pleasing gold colouring as for their scientific value as windows into the past. If you have pyrite specimens and want to stop them from decaying, you can give them a 'quick' soak in water (hour max) then wash them off, and dry them thoroughly in a warm oven. Cool, then…
 
This is a blast from the past and the tale of how I was bitten and smitten by the mineral bug. I hope you enjoy this story from my youth growing up on the northern end of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada—and the minerals that can be found there.
 
Extinct Giants: The Woolly Mammoths. These massive beasts roamed the icy cold tundra of Europe, Asia, and North America from about 300,000 years ago up until about 10,000 years ago making a living by digging through the snow and ice to get to the tough grasses beneath. The last known group of woolly mammoths survived until about 1650 B.C.—over a th…
 
Join in for a chilly visit to the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard between mainland Norway and the North Pole. This one of the world’s northernmost inhabited areas with rugged terrain, glaciers and polar bear. The rocks here house beautiful Triassic ammonoids, bivalves and primitive ichthyosaurs. To see some of the fossils from here, visit: https:…
 
Regine T. Rousseau, wine and spirits expert, writer, presenter, and media personality, focuses on making wine knowledge accessible to people at all levels of proficiency. She is the nominee of 2020 Wine Enthusiast Wine Star Awards, Wine Educator of the Year, an International Sommelier Guild Level II, and Executive Bourbon Steward, Stave and Thief. …
 
Joe Moysiuk is a palaeontologist and evolutionary biologist, with research interests in macroevolution, evolutionary developmental biology, and the origin of animal life. He has extensive experience with fossils from the Burgess Shale of British Columbia, Canada, one of the world’s most significant fossil sites.As part of his continuum of Burgess S…
 
In this episode, the Kosher Sommelier greets wine royalty, Andrew's good friend and colleague, Master Sommelier Dan Pilkey. Hear all about the road to becoming a Master Sommelier, a title that less than 200 people in the world have held. Dan shares countless experiences that will push you to become a more comfortable and confident wine lover. Our p…
 
In this episode, we chat with Alan Berger, owner and operator of Grand Getaways Passover Resort. We discuss the ins and outs of being successful in this highly complex business, the challenges and triumphs, and of course, the incredibly deep wine program that ties it all together. Our program is underwritten by LiquidKosher, a curated kosher wine c…
 
In this episode, we hear from boutique Burgundy importer Jason Berry, of Amitie Wines in San Diego, Calif. Jason shares his road to Burgundy as a wine lover and how he turned that passion into a successful business. Hear about why Burgundy is one of the most important wine regions, and tips to appreciate this fantastic genre at any level. Our progr…
 
Throughout time, wine has been viewed as a sacred elixir. Even today, most people invited to a friend’s home will choose wine as their gift of choice. Not only is it delicious and pairs well with a variety of foods, it’s often used to bring together people from all backgrounds to celebrate life. Molly Matelski, co-founder of Mmmm...Just Enjoy. Wine…
 
Kirk Johnson is a geologist, paleobotanist, and the Sant Director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. His research focuses on fossil plants and the extinction of the dinosaurs, and he is known for his scientific articles, popular books, museum exhibitions, documentaries, and collaborations with artists. Bright, funny and a deli…
 
2022 Palaeontology / Paleontology Lecture Series with all of you. Zoom Link: www.fossiltalksandfieldtrips.com SPRING 2022 Kicking off 2022 is Danna Staaf, the Cephalopodiatrist with Cephalopods are the New Dinosaurs, Sun, February 12, 2022 at 2PM PST. Cephalopods, Earth's first truly substantial animals, are still among us. Their fascinating family…
 
The Rocky Mountain Trench is one of the few geologic wonders we can see from space. It is known as the Valley of a Thousand Peaks or simply the Trench — a large valley on the western side of the northern part of North America's Rocky Mountains.
 
A mighty marine reptile was excavated on the Trent River near Courtenay on the east coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. The excavation is the culmination of a three-year palaeontological puzzle. The fossil remains are those of an elasmosaur — a group of long-necked marine reptiles found in the Late Triassic to the Late Cretaceous s…
 
Nothing says Happy 2022 like free prizes. Thank you to each and every one of you who spent time with me in 2021. It is time to wrap up the year and welcome in 2022. I wish you health, happiness and many fossils.... perhaps as prizes. That's right. It is time to celebrate you! We're starting off 2022 with some great giveaways. Head on over to the AR…
 
About: In episode 5 of The Alcohol-free Sommelier, I interviewed Laura Willoughby MBE, of Club Soda. This bonus episode comes from the Club Soda archive. You can find out more by visiting their website ClubSoda.com . Laura, with guest Tom Ward, chat about the confusing labelling regulations for No & Low drinks in the UK, and the ever-growing range …
 
Lots of producers of No & Low alcohol drinks got into the industry when they decided to change their own drinking choices. They couldn't find what they wanted to drink, so they made their own. Laura Willoughby did it slightly differently - she started a movement. Club Soda was created as a community for people moderating their alcohol intake. It ha…
 
Love the Wild: Moose. One of the most impressive mammals of the Pacific Northwest and the largest living member of the deer family are Moose. They are taller than everyone you know and weighs more than your car. You may encounter them lumbering solo along the edge of rivers and lakes, taking a refreshing swim or happily snacking on short grasses, w…
 
Fossil Field Trip to the Cretaceous Capilano Three Brothers Formation — Vancouver has a spectacular mix of mountains, forests, lowlands, inlets and rivers all wrapped lovingly by the deep blue of the Salish Sea. When we look to the North Shore, the backdrop is made more spectacular by the Coast Mountains with a wee bit of the Cascades tucked in beh…
 
Tom Ward says they go 'ping'. Simon Rucker says they blow up. They're talking about shelf life, and spoilage of non-alc drinks There are two real reasons why our ancestors made and consumed alcoholic drinks: Foodstuffs ferment quite naturally to produce alcohol - it just happens. Once alcohol is present, it tends to preserve the drink. (possibly th…
 
The islands have gone by many names. To the people who call the islands home, Haida Gwaii means Island of the People, it is a shortened version of an earlier name, Haadala Gwaii-ai, or taken out of concealment. Back at the time of Nangkilslas, it was called Didakwaa Gwaii, or “shoreward country.” By any name, the islands are a place of beauty and s…
 
Vinegar was used in drinks to keep them fresh in the days (centuries) before refrigerators. It even stood in for spirits during the American Prohibition. Now it's making a comeback as the backbone of some delicious non-alcoholic drinks. Christine talks to Bethan Higson and Matthew Jukes about the drinks they have created, and what made them choose …
 
Fly with me over to Austria in Europe to visit the Hallstatt Limestones. These are the world's richest Triassic ammonite outcrops. Along with diversified cephalopod fauna — orthoceratids, nautiloids, ammonoids — we also see gastropods, bivalves, especially the late Triassic pteriid bivalve Halobia (the halobiids), brachiopods, crinoids and a few co…
 
Fossil Collecting in the islands of Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada. The mist-shrouded islands of Haida Gwaii are at the western edge of the continental shelf and form part of Wrangellia, an exotic terrane of former island arcs, which also includes Vancouver Island, parts of western mainland British Columbia and southern Alaska. This is a tri…
 
The suppliers you've used for years probably don’t sell No & Low drinks – but Tom Proctor and Daniel Stiller do. Francoise Mathis and Adrian Needham would like to, one day. James Morgan explains why the wrong choice of supplier can cause a traffic jam! Where can non-alcoholic drinks be bought? The suppliers you've used for years probably don’t sell…
 
If you are planning a fossil field trip to Harrison Lake, this is the episode for you! We'll talk about getting there. What to bring and what you'll find. Drive the 30 km up Forestry Road #17, stopping just past Hale Creek at 49.5° N, 121.9° W: paleo-coordinates 42.5° N, 63.4° W, on the west side of Harrison Lake. You'll see Long Island to your rig…
 
Visiting the Great Bear Rainforest takes planning and is well worth the trip. You will want to book a guide to lead you through this 6.4 million hectare wilderness on British Columbia's north and central coasts. I recommend searching www.indigenousbc.com for some wonderful knowledgeable First Nation partners on your excursion. This is a journey, an…
 
In the late 1930s, our understanding of the transition of fish to tetrapods — and the eventual jump to modern vertebrates — took an unexpected leap forward. The evolutionary a'ha came from a single partial fossil skull found on the shores of a riverbank in Eastern Canada. Meet the Stegocephalian, Elpistostege watsoni, an extinct genus of finned tet…
 
Can dealcoholized wine be improved? The answer is maybe, or maybe not. Matthew Jukes & Amanda Thomson disagree, industry insiders Imma Cannavo, Harry Crowther & Francoise Mathis set out their wish-lists, and regular contributor James Morgan explains why some alcohol-free wine can taste, well .... terrible! Wine seems to be the poor relation of the …
 
The Oregon Coast on the western edge of the USA is a wonderful place to collect fossils. The area has been known for its wonderful fossil fauna since the 1830s. Here we find middle Miocene (along with a wee bit of Eocene) outcrops with delicious fossil whale bone, fish teeth, turtle shell, and a magnificent assortment of molluscs — the gastropods C…
 
High up in the Canadian Rocky Mountains there are mysteries more than half a billion years old. These are the outcrops of the Burgess Shale Biota — more than 150 species that provide a window into life in our Cambrian seas. Charles Doolittle Walcott will be forever remembered for his extraordinary discovery of the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale of Y…
 
Gentoo Penguins with their black, white natural colouring akin to formal wear — are some of my favourite animals. They are foraging predators — dining on crustaceans, fish and squid in the cold nearshore waters of the Antarctic Peninsula, Falkland Islands, South Georgia and Sandwich Islands. South Georgia, the South Sandwich Islands and the Falklan…
 
We owe a huge nod of gratitude to the wee photosynthetic microbes known as cyanobacteria for their work in helping to create the first oxygen to enter our atmosphere and make you and I — & indeed all life on Earth — possible. When the Earth formed 4.5 billion years ago, it was an inhospitable place. Even with a Sun some 25 per cent weaker than it i…
 
When I was little, maybe 5 or 6 years old, I struck gold! Well, it wasn't real gold, but I was most convinced. Someone had dumped a tailings pile near the woods where I lived and in the sun, those crushed pieces of rock sparkled. I had already been bitten by the love of minerals and fossils and so naturally I filled my pockets and brought as much h…
 
One of the most delightful palaeontologists to grace our Earth was José Fernando Bonaparte (14 June 1928 – 18 February 2020). He was an Argentinian paleontologist who you'll know as the discoverer of some of Argentina's iconic dinosaurs — Carnotaurus (the "Bull" dinosaur we've talked about in a previous episode), along with Amargasaurus, Abelisauru…
 
The Great Karoo was formed in a vast inland basin starting 320 million years ago, at a time when that part of Gondwana which would eventually become Africa, lay over the South Pole. The Karoo records a wonderful time in our evolutionary history when the world was inhabited by interesting amphibians and mammal-like reptiles — including the apex pred…
 
Marble Canyon in British Columbia, Canada is a lovely place to hike. Here you can see some of the oldest freshwater stromatolites on Earth and one of our oldest lifeforms. The canyon's name comes from the brilliant limestone of its walls. The bedrock is microcrystalline limestone (sedimentary rock) rather than marble (metamorphic rock). The rocks f…
 
Plate tectonics looks at Earth’s outer layer. It is made up of large, moving pieces called plates. All of Earth’s land and water sit on these plates. The plates are made of solid rock. Under the plates is a weaker layer of partially melted rock. The plates are constantly moving over this weaker layer. Think of the Earth as an egg. The outer hard sh…
 
Amber is fossilized tree resin that has been appreciated for its colour and natural beauty since the Neolithic. We find amber around the globe, generally in rocks that are Cretaceous or younger. Tree resin or sap is essential to a tree. Roots take up water and nutrients, and these need to be spread throughout the tree. Sap is the viscous liquid tha…
 
One of the classic Vancouver Island fossil localities is the Santonian-Maastrichtian, Upper Cretaceous Haslam Formation Motocross Pit near Brannen Lake, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada. The quarry is no longer active as such though there is a busy little gravel quarry a little way down the road closer to Ammonite falls near Benson Creek Falls. To…
 
Koala, Phasscolarctos cinereus, are truly adorable marsupials native to Australia. These cuddly "teddy bears" are not bears at all. Koalas belong to a group of mammals known as marsupials. Fossil remains of Koala-like animals have been found dating back to 25 million years ago. As the climate changed and Australia became drier, ancient vegetation e…
 
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