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Stress shrinks your brain. Neuroscientist Lisa Genova explains how to strengthen it.Up next, How to double your brain power | Tiago ForteIt may not feel like it when you can't find your phone or "lose" your sunglasses sitting atop your head, but your memory is an amazing ability -- and one we want to protect. So it's little wonder that any blips or…
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In our news wrap Monday, Israeli officials say Prime Minister Netanyahu has dissolved his war cabinet, more than 20 countries in the NATO alliance will hit their defense spending targets this year, Maryland Gov. Wes Moore issued more than 175,000 pardons for marijuana convictions and a federal judge temporarily halted a Biden administration rule ex…
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Team USA Wheelchair Basketball player Brian Bell joins us to talk about the ins and outs of this Paralympic sport. Brian has been part of Team USA for the Rio 2016 and Tokyo 2020 Paralympics, both of which were gold-medal-winning performances. Brian and Team USA will be looking for the three-peat at Paris 2024. Follow Brian on social! He's on Insta…
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Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report with Amy Walter and Sophia Cai of Axios join Amna Nawaz to discuss the latest political news, from an A-list fundraiser in Hollywood to a roundtable at a Black church in Michigan, the two leading presidential candidates were in search of campaign cash and votes this weekend. PBS NewsHour is supported by - htt…
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Israel's military said Sunday it will limit fighting in a small area of southern Gaza to allow the passage of aid, a move condemned by far-right members of Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition. Meanwhile, world leaders gathered in Switzerland for a Ukraine peace summit, where national security advisor Jake Sullivan played a key role. Nick Schifrin talks …
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In our news wrap Sunday, shootings in Texas and Michigan left two people dead and 15 wounded, Russian state media says security forces stormed a detention center after prisoners took two guards hostage, and an oil spill at one of Singapore's most famous beaches is raising environmental and economic concerns. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://w…
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In 2021, the Chicago suburb of Evanston, Illinois, became the first U.S. city to offer reparations to Black Americans for past housing discrimination. Now, a conservative legal group is challenging the program in court, saying it unconstitutionally discriminates against residents who aren't Black. John Yang speaks with Brandis Friedman of PBS membe…
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Graphic novelist Raina Telgemeier has been described as "like the Beatles for teenagers." Her popular books depict feelings and emotions young people may not want to talk about with adults, like adolescent anxiety, loneliness and embarrassment. John Yang sits down with Telgemeier to discuss her work and her legions of fans. PBS NewsHour is supporte…
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Dr. William Lynn Weaver, a renowned surgeon, helped integrate a Knoxville high school in 1964. Even in those difficult times, he felt safe and supported thanks to his father, Ted Weaver, who worked long hours as a janitor and chauffeur. In this animated feature from our partners at StoryCorps, Dr. Weaver remembered his father's influence in this 20…
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In our news wrap Saturday, Vice President Harris pledged aid for Ukraine's hard-hit energy sector at a peace summit in Switzerland, eight Israeli soldiers died in an explosion in southern Gaza, nearly 2 million Muslims gathered at Mount Arafat for Hajj, protesters in France marched against a far-right party, and the Princess of Wales made her first…
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A first-of-its-kind report from the American Cancer Society is shedding new light on cancer risks for LGBTQ+ people. It found that some LGBTQ+ populations are more likely to have cancer risk factors, less likely to be screened for certain types of cancer, and face barriers to high-quality health care. John Yang speaks with Dr. William Dahut, chief …
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In many American households, domestic workers like nannies, housekeepers and home health aides perform essential tasks. But they also have fewer rights and protections than most U.S. workers. Oxfam senior researcher Caitlin Henderson joins Ali Rogin to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders Episode: https…
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Every year in the United States, as many as a billion birds die while migrating. These birds aren't being killed by climate change or toxic substances in the air or water, but by collisions with glass. For our ongoing series "Saving Species," John Yang reports on an effort in Philadelphia to reduce the carnage. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https:…
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Friday on the News Hour, the Supreme Court strikes down a ban on bump stocks that allow semi-automatic weapons to fire like machine guns. A Justice Department report finds the Phoenix Police Department routinely discriminated, used excessive force and violated civil rights. Plus, a look at the water shortage gripping Mexico City and failure to supp…
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The Supreme Court handed down a ruling with major implications for firearm regulations. In a 6-3 decision, the conservative majority found that the government exceeded its authority when it banned bump stocks. The gun accessory allows users to re-engage the trigger continuously, dramatically increasing the rate of fire. Amna Nawaz discussed more wi…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: Finally, a conversation about education reform and some of its shortfalls. It is the subject of a new book by a familiar face, who joins Jeffrey Brown for tonight’s Making the Grade. JEFFREY BROWN: For close to two decades now, or even longer, depending on your perspective, education reform has been on the agenda of Democrats and Rep…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: Finally, a conversation about education reform and some of its shortfalls. It is the subject of a new book by a familiar face, who joins Jeffrey Brown for tonight’s Making the Grade. JEFFREY BROWN: For close to two decades now, or even longer, depending on your perspective, education reform has been on the agenda of Democrats and Rep…
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This is part of an ongoing series of reports called ‘Chasing the Dream,’ which reports on poverty and opportunity in America. By Megan Thompson and Mori Rothman MEGAN THOMPSON: Nancy Kukay works at a community college in Maryland, coordinating technical education programs. She’s worked in education most of her career and loves her job. But at 65-ye…
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This is part of an ongoing series of reports called ‘Chasing the Dream,’ which reports on poverty and opportunity in America. By Megan Thompson and Mori Rothman MEGAN THOMPSON: Nancy Kukay works at a community college in Maryland, coordinating technical education programs. She’s worked in education most of her career and loves her job. But at 65-ye…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: Now some perspective on the presidency of Barack Obama and the election of Donald Trump. Hari Sreenivasan has this latest addition to the NewsHour Bookshelf. HARI SREENIVASAN: Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential election was historic for many reasons, but, for all the firsts, the eight years of the Obama administration also fueled a bac…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: Twitter remains President Trump’s preferred platform to vent frustrations. This week’s targets, the NFL, a high-ranking Republican senator, and claims of fake news. They speak to and, in some cases, fuel debates that divide the country. More on that now with Karine Jean-Pierre. She’s a senior adviser to MoveOn.org and a contributing …
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JUDY WOODRUFF: But, first, we continue with our America Addicted series, looking at the opioid epidemic. Roughly 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain. And most health officials agree that legal painkillers, prescribed by doctors and filled by pharmacies, triggered a tidal wave of addiction throughout the U.S. Recent guidelines from the Ce…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: Now a look at the winner of this year’s Nobel Prize in economics, announced today. Richard Thaler is a professor at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business. The award acknowledged his groundbreaking work in establishing the field of behavioral economics, which blends psychology with economics to better understand human d…
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HARI SREENIVASAN, PBS NEWSHOUR WEEKEND ANCHOR: Hurricane Maria destroyed Puerto Rico’s power grid, but it turns out Puerto Rico’s power company was in deep trouble before the storm struck two weeks ago. “Reuters” reporter Jessica Resnick-Ault has reported on that side of the story. She joins me now from Metairie, Louisiana, where she is already dep…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: And in a piece of related news, the White House wouldn’t confirm or deny that President Trump will decertify the Iran nuclear deal before the October 15 deadline. It is being widely reported that he will take that step, and leave it to Congress to consider to reimpose sanctions. White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders says Mr. Trum…
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MICHAEL OATES, Welder: I would wake up in the morning and take four pills and snort two. That’s just to get out of bed. PAUL SOLMAN, Economics Correspondent: Michael Oates, a lifelong welder, is recovering from a 10-year opioid addiction which began when he took Vicodin for pain while working at a steel mill. Did you lose the job? MICHAEL OATES: Ac…
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MICHAEL OATES, Welder: I would wake up in the morning and take four pills and snort two. That’s just to get out of bed. PAUL SOLMAN, Economics Correspondent: Michael Oates, a lifelong welder, is recovering from a 10-year opioid addiction which began when he took Vicodin for pain while working at a steel mill. Did you lose the job? MICHAEL OATES: Ac…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: Now let’s turn to our series on the opioid crisis, its enormous toll in American life, and efforts to get a handle on it. We have spent the past couple of days showing some of the devastation it has wreaked, as more and more people have become hooked. Tonight, as part of our weekly Leading Edge science segment, Miles O’Brien explores…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: While the shooter’s motives remain unclear, we are learning more about the veritable arsenal that this man brought into his hotel room. William Brangham explains how some of those weapons were likely modified to become even more deadly. WILLIAM BRANGHAM: You can hear it in those horrible cell phone videos from Sunday night. (GUNFIRE)…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: And now to our America Addicted series. Drug use has been down among teenagers, but mortality is rising. And that is leading many to seek out new options for their children. The “NewsHour”‘s Pamela Kirkland went to look at how one so-called recovery school in Indianapolis is giving new hope to students battling addiction. It’s part o…
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HARI SREENIVASAN: But first: The political storms keep raging around the Trump White House, from Puerto Rico to North Korea. Lisa Desjardins has more. LISA DESJARDINS: That’s right. Thanks, Hari. It means it’s time for Politics Monday. We’re joined, of course, by our regulars, Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report and Tamara Keith of NPR. What a …
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By Sam Weber and Laura Fong JEFF GREENFIELD: On a recent Tuesday evening, dozens of Wisconsin voters gathered in a Milwaukee public library, to hear about a campaign — aimed not at protecting the right to vote, but about where those votes are cast. The featured speakers were Dale Schultz and Tim Cullen, both former state senators, both leaders of o…
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By Ivette Feliciano and Zachary Green IVETTE FELICIANO: Since Hurricane Maria hit, 40-year-old barber Hector Cruz Santiago hasn’t been able to reach his 20-year-old daughter, who’s a student at the University of Puerto Rico, in San Juan. HECTOR CRUZ SANTIAGO: Nothing. I’ve tried a thousand ways to communicate, and I haven’t been able to. It really …
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JUDY WOODRUFF: Sometimes overlooked in this week’s debate over whether athletes should take a knee during the playing of the national anthem before games is the original focus of Colin Kaepernick’s protest, the deaths of unarmed black men in confrontations with law enforcement. Riley Temple is a lawyer and author. And, tonight, he shares his Humble…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: And let’s turn to a different conversation on questions of sexism, in tech, finance and Silicon Valley. Ellen Pao became a kind of cause celebre in 2012 after she filed a gender discrimination lawsuit against her employer, the powerful venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins. Pao had been a junior partner and claimed that her bosses did…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: And let’s turn to a different conversation on questions of sexism, in tech, finance and Silicon Valley. Ellen Pao became a kind of cause celebre in 2012 after she filed a gender discrimination lawsuit against her employer, the powerful venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins. Pao had been a junior partner and claimed that her bosses did…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: The president launched a major campaign today to pass big tax cuts, and perhaps the most sweeping overhaul of the tax code in more than three decades. Many key details are not yet decided. Whether he can succeed is very much an open question. But the president and congressional leaders said today they have ambitious plans, which incl…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: But first: the dangers of domestic terrorism, extremism and efforts to counter its use of social media. The attack in Charlottesville underscored just how real this is. As Miles O’Brien explains, experts who study the psychological and technological underpinnings of extremism say neo-Nazis and Islamic terrorists are cut from the same…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: Puerto Rico, prostrate. The U.S. territory’s cries for help grew louder today, and echoed all the way to the White House. P.J. Tobia begins our coverage. P.J. TOBIA: The desperate plea of an island in distress painted on a rooftop. Nearly a week after Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico, most people don’t have enough food or drinking…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: For some parents in the U.S., it’s a question in the fall: Should they vaccinate their children to send them to school? The American Academy of Pediatrics believes so and says that a measles outbreak that started at Disneyland a few years ago shows how fast childhood diseases can resurface if not enough children are protected. Califo…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: Meantime, it’s time for our Politics Monday team to look at not just the Affordable Care Act, but what we have been talking about earlier in the program, the feud between the president and the National Football League. Joining us now, Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report, Tamara Keith of NPR, Politics Monday. Amy, you just heard L…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: This hurricane season has seen one devastating storm after another. Harvey, Irma and now Maria have left communities in ruin in their wake and put a spotlight on the problems plaguing the U.S.’ National Flood Insurance Program. That’s the subject Paul Solman tackles on our weekly economics series, Making Sense. LENI SHUCHTER, Pequann…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: But first: one on one with Michael Bloomberg, the billionaire philanthropist, businessman and former mayor of New York City. As world leaders and other notable dignitaries gather in New York this week for the U.N. General Assembly, Bloomberg hosted a special forum today about economic challenges facing the country and the world. We s…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: Recep Tayyip Erdogan has led Turkey since 2003, first as prime minister, and since 2014 as president, an office he has remade into the nation’s preeminent leader. Turkey has been an ally of the U.S. for decades, but that alliance is now tense. A main source of division, U.S. support for Syrian Kurdish militia known as the YPG, and it…
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JUDY WOODRUFF: Next, we conclude our special education series Rethinking College. Tonight, how one university offers customized learning to fit the busy lives of nontraditional students. Hari Sreenivasan has our report, part of our weekly segment Making the Grade. HARI SREENIVASAN: Terence Burley lives on the Navajo reservation in Northern Arizona,…
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‘What Happened,’ according to Hillary Clinton (full interview) WILLIAM BRANGHAM: On Friday: Judy Woodruff sat down with Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state and Democratic presidential candidate, to discuss her new book titled “What Happened.” We return now to that interview, when Judy asked about Clinton’s campaign against Donald Trump a…
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MEGAN THOMPSON: This summer, when President Trump withdrew the U.S. from the 2015 Paris climate accord — a voluntary pact to cut emissions of gases that cause global warming — some opposition came from what is perhaps a surprising place: big business. In response, hundreds of large U.S. companies publicly pledged to reduce their reliance on fossil …
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‘What Happened,’ according to Hillary Clinton HARI SREENIVASAN: Hillary Clinton, she is one of the most prominent and polarizing figures in modern American history. This week, she is back in the spotlight promoting a new book. She opens up tonight to Judy Woodruff, revealing where she gives President Trump credit, but also her fears that he is dang…
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HARI SREENIVASAN: But first: Tech giants are increasingly under scrutiny from politicians, regulators and experts on the left and the right. Some are concerned about their growing power, even calling them monopolies. And the tension keeps building, whether over privacy, politics or the displacement of workers by automation. Yet their role in contem…
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JOHN YANG: Now we return to our Rethinking College series. This week, we take a look at efforts to help unemployed coal miners earn community college degrees and get on-the-job training. Hari Sreenivasan has our report, part of our weekly segment Making the Grade. HARI SREENIVASAN: In the heart of Appalachia, generations of coal miners have lived t…
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