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A podcast that's enthusiastic about linguistics by Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne. A weird and deep conversation about language delivered right to your ears the third Thursday of every month. "Joyously nerdy" –Buzzfeed. Listened to all the episodes here and wish there were more? Want to talk with other people who are enthusiastic about linguistics? Get bonus episodes and access to our Discord community at www.patreon.com/lingthusiasm Shownotes and transcripts: www.lingthusiasm.com
 
Light-hearted conversation with callers from all over about new words, old sayings, slang, family expressions, and language change and differences, as well as word histories, etymology, linguistics, regional dialects, word games, grammar, books, literature, writing, and more. Listeners of all backgrounds can join author/journalist Martha Barnette and linguist/lexicographer Grant Barrett on the show with their language thoughts, questions, and stories: https://waywordradio.org/contact or word ...
 
Welcome to the official podcast of World Linguistics. Here you’ll find inspiration if you’re a language learner and tips on how to learn languages. You’ll also discover some of the reasons why learning languages is important in the twenty first century. Visit https://www.patreon.com/worldlinguistics to access all of our tutoring services. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/worldlinguistics/support
 
This podcast series will highlight some of the most important aspects of linguistics. Over the span of numerous episodes, we’ll discuss topics such as the definition of linguistics, history of the English language, word structure, speech sounds, grammar, meaning, sentence structure, and more. If you’re interested in learning more about language but don’t have oodles of free time, this series will introduce you to the beauty of linguistics in short and sweet light-hearted episodes.
 
en clair is a podcast about forensic linguistics, literary detection, language mysteries, cryptography, codes, language and the law, linguistic crime, undeciphered languages, and more, from past to present. Credits, links, podcast transcripts and more in the Case Notes: wp.lancs.ac.uk/enclair
 
Linguistics After Dark is a podcast where three linguists (and sometimes other people) answer your burning questions about language, linguistics, and whatever else you need advice about. We have three rules: any question is fair game, there's no research allowed, and if we can't answer, we have to drink. It's a little like CarTalk for language: call us if your language is making a funny noise, and we'll get to the bottom of it, with a lot of rowdy discussion and nerdy jokes along the way. At ...
 
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Hanmadi Korean Linguistics

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Hanmadi Korean Linguistics

Sara McAdory-Kim and Jaymin Kim

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What do Portuguese explorers have to do with the Korean word for “bread”? Why has the Korean government started using a new word for “website”? And how come there’s a different word for “house” when you’re talking about your grandmother? This biweekly podcast takes you on a deep dive into Korean linguistics through the lens of a single word per episode. Hosted by Jaymin, a native Korean speaker and history professor, and Sara, a 2nd language Korean speaker with a graduate education in lingui ...
 
(We are now on Lybsyn) As humans we must understand the limits of our wisdom and ask questions to expand our knowledge for full understanding of life. We know the best way to do this is to expose yourself to anything and learn directly from people involved in situation. Providing a lighter perspective on recurrences or patterns in our every day life, we want to bring you guys one the best podcasts available because of our outlook on life as a 'millennial'. So please tune in, and give it a li ...
 
Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE, with selected new podcasts that will span a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology, and medicine. Our Podcasts are designed to act as teaching tools, providing further insight into our content through editor and author commentaries and interviews with special guests. SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and ...
 
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We tend to take the index of a book for granted, but centuries ago, these helpful lists were viewed with suspicion. Some even worried that indexes would harm reading comprehension! A witty new book tells the story. Plus, the Latin term bona fides [BOHN-ah FYDZ] was adopted into English to mean "good faith" or "authentic credentials." But there's mo…
 
Thank you so very much for listening! If you haven’t already done so, be sure to subscribe to World Linguistics TV on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/WorldLinguisticsTV,, and subscribe to the podcast, and don’t forget to visit us at patreon.com/worldlinguistics to enroll in Spanish tutoring or conversation practice.--- This episode is sponsored …
 
Sometimes, we use language to make definite statements about how the world is. Other times, we get more hypothetical, and talk about how things could be. What can happen. What may occur. What might be the case. What will happen (or would, if only we should have known!) What we must and shall end up with. In other words, we use a part of language kn…
 
It’s crude. It’s rude. And it’s a lot of fun. Slang has been with us for as long as people didn’t want others to understand what they were about. But what exactly is it? And has the nature of slang changed in our internet age? Daniel is talking to eminent slang lexicographer Jonathon Green on this episode of Because Language.…
 
People who hunt treasure with metal detectors have a lingo all their own. Canslaw means the shreds of aluminum cans left after a lawnmower ran over them. And gold dance? That's the happy jig you do if you find something far more valuable than an old can. Plus, a splendid new dictionary offers an in-depth look at the rich language of Southern Appala…
 
Imagine telling someone how to get to your home, but without using the name of your street, or any other street within 10 miles. Could you do it? We take street names for granted, but these words are useful for far more, like applying for a job or bank loan -- and they're a powerful record of who and what we value. Plus, a third-grader asks why the…
 
Welcome back! In this week's episode, we'll discuss some critical issues within the American educational system, and how we, as a global society, can combat them to change the system and enact social change to empower economically disadvantaged pupils. Subscribe to World Linguistics TV at https://www.youtube.com/worldlinguisticstv. Sign up for Span…
 
If you take up texting and social media late in life, there’s a lot to learn! A twenty-something wants advice getting her dad up to speed on memes, Instagram, and animated images. Plus, when you’re on a long road trip, what do you call that one driver you keep passing on the freeway, or who sets the pace for your car mile after mile? Road buddy? So…
 
Welcome back! In this week’s episode, we are talking about semantics and communication.--- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/worldlinguistics/messageSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/worldlinguistics/support…
 
In this week’s episode, we’ll discuss volver and its present indicative and preterite verb conjugations to better understand their spellings and pronunciations. Before we begin, I would like to give a huge thank you to all of our listeners and viewers. We would not be able to make such an incredible impact without all of you, so thank you. Also, I’…
 
Ever wonder what medieval England looked and sounded like? In Old English, the word hord meant “treasure” and your wordhord was the treasure of words locked up inside you. A delightful new book uses the language of that period to create a vivid look at everyday life. Plus, a shotgun house is long and narrow with no hallway — just one room leading i…
 
Don’t move my cheese! It’s a phrase middle managers use to talk about adapting to change in the workplace. Plus, the origin story of the name William, and why it’s Guillermo in Spanish. And a five-year-old poses a question that puzzles a lot of people: Why is the letter Q so often followed by a U? All that, and adynaton, an assonant quiz, do it up …
 
In Old English, the word "world", or weorold, did not refer to a place. It was a compound word comprising wer, meaing "man", and ald, meaning "age". "World" literally meant "the age of man", and in many of its earliest usages, it's more closely related to a man's "lifetime" or "lifespan" than the earth he inhabits. We also look at some unlikely cog…
 
Thank you so very much for listening! If you haven’t already done so, be sure to subscribe to World Linguistics TV on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/WorldLinguisticsTV,, and subscribe to the podcast, and don’t forget to visit us at patreon.com/worldlinguistics to enroll in Spanish tutoring.--- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest …
 
When societies of humans come into contact, they’ll often pick up words from each other. When this is happening actively in the minds of multilingual people, it gets called codeswitching; when it happened long before anyone alive can remember, it’s more likely to get called etymology. But either way, this whole spectrum is a kind of borrowing. In t…
 
If you speak a second or third language, you may remember the first time you dreamed in that new tongue. But does this milestone mean you’re actually fluent? And a couple’s dispute over the word regret: Say you wish you’d been able to meet Albert Einstein. Can you regret that the two of you never met, or is there a better word for a situation over …
 
Welcome back to World Linguistics Podcast. In this week's episode, we'll learn about the Spanish verb hablar and its present perfect and conditional verb conjugations to better understand their spellings and their pronunciations.Subscribe to World Linguistics TV today at https://www.youtube.com/WorldLinguisticsTV.Sign up for Spanish tutoring at htt…
 
How is language like a game of charades? According to a new book, quite a lot. Charades players and language users improvise and work together to create meaning in a situation, and they get better at it as they reuse elements and build up patterns. Drs Morten Christiansen and Nick Chater explain their vision of language to Daniel and Hedvig on this…
 
Do you refer to your dog or cat as “somebody”? As in: When you love somebody that much, you don’t mind if they slobber. In other words, is your pet a somebody or a something? Also, for centuries, there was little consistency in the way many English words were spelled. But long before the printing press helped to standardize spelling, powerful histo…
 
Listen to our latest episode to learn how to conjugate decir in the imperfect, and in the subjunctive. Sign up for Spanish tutoring at https://www.patreon.com/worldlinguistics.--- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/worldlinguistics/messageSupp…
 
The word filibuster has a long and colorful history, going back to the days when pirates roamed the high seas. Today it refers to hijacking a piece of legislation. Plus, the language of yoga teachers: When doing a guided meditation, you may hear your instructor speaking in a kind of continuous present, with phrases like sitting comfortably and brea…
 
Welcome back to World Linguistics Podcast! In this week's episode, we'll dicsuss the Spanish verb "hablar" and its imperfect and present subjunctive conjugations.Subscribe to World Linguistics TV at https://www.youtube.com/WorldLinguisticsTV.Learn more about our tutoring services at https://www.patreon.com/worldlinguistics.Follow World Linguistics …
 
Sure, there’s winter, spring, summer, and fall. But the seasons in between have even more poetic names. In Alaska, greenup describes a sudden, dramatic burst of green after a long, dark winter. And there are many, many terms for a cold snap that follows the first taste of spring: blackberry winter, redbud winter, onion snow, and whippoorwill storm,…
 
In this week’s episode, we’ll discuss Conjugar and its imperfect and present subjunctive verb conjugations to better understand their spellings and pronunciations. Signup for Spanish tutoring with Kyle Mathis at https://www.patreon.com/worldlinguistics.--- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/a…
 
The Rosetta Stone is famous as an inscription that let us read Egyptian hieroglyphs again, but it was created in the first place as part of a long history of signage as performative multilingualism in public places. Choosing between languages is both very personal but it’s not only personal -- it’s also a reflection of the way that the societies we…
 
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