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Anglo-Saxon England

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Anglo-Saxon England is a podcast looking at the history of Anglo-Saxon England, beginning with the end of Roman Britain and ending with the Norman Conquest. We will not only talk about the history but also the literature, culture, and historiography of the Anglo-Saxon period. This show strives to offer an accessible but scholarly rigorous overview that will appeal both to beginners and to experts.
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Series 1 is a concise social and political history of England from the 5th to 11th centuries. Series 2 is a social history how society and lordship worked during and directly after the migration period. It then looks at how that culture evolved, as the impact of economic development and the Viking invasions wrought changes in lordship and political structures. It looks also at the landscape - how it affected peoples' lives, how the Anglo Saxons shaped it in turn - and some of the marks ordin ...
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The Wanderer. This is a podcast for Anglo-Saxon Heathenism, history and mythology. We will discuss subjects such as Yggdrasil, the world tree, the Anglo Saxon Runes, The people who were alive at the time when Heathenism was the only religion open to them, how the people worshipped their gods, and which gods were most popular to different sections of Anglo Saxon Society. This is a PayPal link if anyone wants to donate a dollar or a pound to help keep the podcast going. If you would like to su ...
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The Anglo-Saxon Podcast

D. C. C. Randell

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Do the Anglo-Saxons still have relevance? Do they really matter? I’d like to posit that they do, and in this podcast, we'll be hearing directly from the Anglo-Saxons themselves in order to better understand who these people were and how they viewed the world around them. Join me, as we read from Bede's Ecclesiastical History, Alfred's Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Beowulf, and more.
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With the death of Sighere in 688, Essex’s tendency for pagan reaction came to an end. This did not mean that the kingdom was left in peace, however. Credits – Music: 'Wælheall' by Hrōðmund Wōdening https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQfdqIyqJ4g&list=LL&index=5&ab_channel=Hr%C5%8D%C3%B0mundW%C5%8Ddening Social Media - Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/a…
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Warland was held by all free Anglo Saxon families, and so called because the resources of the land were to be used for the waru, defence of the land. That might mean military defence - but it was a much more general concept that tha - it was to be used in defence of the health and well being of the community. The responsibilities of the holder of w…
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Anglo-Saxon folklore is rich with tales of supernatural beings and shape-shifting entities, though werewolves specifically were not as prominent as in other European cultures. Instead, there was a focus on various mythical creatures, spirits, and magical beings. The Anglo-Saxons believed in shape-shifters and creatures capable of transforming into …
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As 7th century turns into 8th, society becomes a little more hierarchical; tribute centres like Rendlesham begin to disappear for more permanent royal sites. But more significant for the life of many Ceorlisc families, was the arrival of Christianity. Because the new religion brought with it new institutions - priests, minsters, monasteries. These …
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The kingdom of the East Saxons was one of the mid-sized early Anglo-Saxon kingdoms and the last in our survey of the construct made by later historians called the ‘Heptarchy’. A kingdom repeatedly wracked by pagan reaction, Essex's early history is one filled with religious upheaval and intrigue making it an explosive send-off to the Heptarchy. Cre…
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The 7th and 8th centuries saw the gradual development of territorial grouping, with tribal and political identities, focussed on the lord or king. Despite more well defined hierarchies, lordship remained relatively light, based on lords who travelled from place to place. At tribute centres, they would to meet with their people and receive their tri…
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Following Cædwalla’s death in 688 Sussex seemingly did not regain its independence. As with the early history of Sussex, the kingdom’s history post-688 is again one of long stretches of obscurity occasionally broken by flashes of insight. Credits – Music: 'Wælheall' by Hrōðmund Wōdening https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQfdqIyqJ4g&list=LL&index=5&ab…
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The culture of the early Free farmers of the Germanic settlers valued family, kinship and lordship. Oxfordshire may have been one of the earliest areas of settlement, fitting initially into the Romano British states they find as they arrive - such as at the old Roman town of Dorchester. From there they begin to settle the places that offer the best…
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The Anglo-Saxon spear was a crucial weapon in the arsenal of the Anglo-Saxon warriors during the early medieval period, particularly in England from the 5th to the 11th centuries. It was one of the primary weapons used by infantry soldiers, alongside swords, axes, and shields. Key features of the Anglo-Saxon spear included: Design: The spear typica…
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The departure of Rome from Britain and the Romano British society that follows is the story of many generations. After a brief overview the episode turns to consider some alternate theories of one aspect of the period - the adventus saxonum. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.…
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Last time I discussed the origin myth of Sussex and how this compares to the archaeological record for early Saxon presence in the southeast of England. According to legend, the final notable date of early South Saxon history was 491 with Ælle’s and Cissa’s victory over the Britons of Andredes cester. We saw how these later legends do not line up w…
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1066 was a year that changed a lot of things - though not as much as you might think. 3 experienced war leaders fought for control of England - and we all know who won, so no need to worry about plot spoilers. The History of England podcast takes us up the coronation of William at Westminster Abbey, Christmas day 1066 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com…
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The Normans made a massive impact on Europe, not just England. They went on to establish a kingdom in Southern Italy, and lead the Crusades and the resulting state of Outremer. So the History of England looks at where they came from, with a brief history of Normandy before 1066 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.…
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Anglo Saxon England has been seen by some commentators as a bit of a basket case by 1066 - out of date and ready to be conquered. But actually England had its great strengths that would have been the envy of continental monarch, if they'd spent any time thinking about that small, damp island somewhere off the continental coast. The History of Engla…
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Edward enjoyed one year of independence in 1051-2, before the return of Godwin forced him into humiliating submission. But after Godwin’s death the following year, the rest of his reign was broadly peaceful and prosperous, including building Westminster Abbey. Though that’s not to say there’s no political difficulties along the way. Hosted on Acast…
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Cnut’s dynasty survived him by only 7 years, and in 1042 the house of Cerdic returned in the form of Edward the Confessor. Edward is an enigma – weak man or determined survivor? This week the History of England podcast looks at how he came to the throne and his first 10 years. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.…
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Cnut was pretty much the complete king. Conqueror of the English, ruler of a Scandinavian empire that spanned 4 countries. And a man who knew how to win the peace as well as the war. The History of England podcast this week looks at his reign. Cnut was probably born around 990, and by 1016 had become the ruler of England. He was to rule for the nex…
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In 1012, Aethelred looked down and out. But Svein died, and Edmund Ironside appeared on the scene. Suddenly, Aethelred was a real king and all action, and Cnut was forced to flee. But he came back, and 1016 saw one of the great confrontations of English History, and a great ‘what-might-have-been’ man in Edmund Ironside, before he got an arrow up hi…
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Aethelred's mother gets her son onto the throne at last. But it's not long before the disadvantages of kingship become clear, as the Danes begin to return with increasing force. Aethelred turned 18 in 983, and by 984 has sent his mother away and reigns with his own men. But three years of raids, 997-999 beging to demonstrate the weakness of the Eng…
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