Science Weekly δημόσια
[search 0]
Περισσότερα

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Exploring the coolest and most incredible stuff in science, from way back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth to a future where humans live in space! Fun Kids Science Weekly is hosted by Dan and is the perfect science podcast for kids and families everywhere. Each week, you'll find episodes from series like Deep Space High, Age of the Dinosaurs and Professor Hallux. There's also a special guest, top experts answering all your science questions and Dangerous Dan - something scientific that’s also ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
What actually is in our blood? Why can Cheetahs run so fast? Author Paul Ian Cross joins us to chat all the grossest things about the body from is book Bodies, Brains and Bogies. In Science in the News this week we learn about the first rocket NASA has launched outside of the USA, a spacecraft being built in the UK and a new secret we have learnt f…
 
Last week, public health officials declared a ‘national incident’ after they found vaccine-derived poliovirus in London sewage samples. No cases of polio symptoms have been reported but there is evidence the virus is spreading. So what does it mean to have found the virus almost 20 years after the UK was declared polio-free? Ian Sample speaks to ep…
 
NEWS: Sugar-studded protein is key to an Alzheimer's cure | The Brighter Side (01:38) In a bit of “reverse engineering” research using brain tissues from five people who died with Alzheimer’s disease, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they discovered that a special sugar molecule could play a key role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease.…
 
We’ve heard a lot about social robots – do they help? One or two studies are not going to answer this, but a systematic review and meta analysis will! It turns out when you combined all the data, they do help in social abilities, but not other areas. This is how technology can help those with autism, especially technology which can be adapted to ad…
 
When the Guardian’s UK technology editor Alex Hern was contacted on Twitter to ask if he was involved in a new cryptocurrency called Tsuka, he assumed they just wanted him to buy it. He ignored the messages. But soon after Alex realised that, without knowing it, he was already involved. What happened next reveals a lot about the strange world of ‘s…
 
How can we save our coral reefs, and why are they so important? Marine Biologist David Smith joins us this week to tell us exactly why and how we can help! We answer your questions on why we have such wrinkly fingers when we are in the bath too long. And we are joined by Professor Hallux and Nurse Nanobot for the last time this week, and it's all a…
 
After wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone national park in 1995, researchers noticed some big ecological changes, leading to the regeneration of the landscape. It’s an argument used to justify the return of apex predators – but it’s increasingly being challenged. Phoebe Weston talks to Ian Sample about whether wolves really have the power to sh…
 
They support an incredible array of biodiversity and may also be some of the world’s most effective carbon sinks. But vast swathes of seagrass meadows have been lost in the last century, and they continue to vanish at the rate of a football pitch every half hour. Madeleine Finlay makes a trip out of the Guardian office to visit a rewilding project …
 
This week’s podcast highlights a paper from the IBIS (infant brain imaging study) that tracks infants from 6 months to 5 years of age to examine how ASD symptoms cluster together. These infants either have a diagnosis or they don’t, or they have something which doesn’t meet diagnostic threshold but is still impairing in some way. Ignoring the actua…
 
SHOW NOTES 01:50 The first perovskite solar cell with a commercially viable lifetime is here | Interesting Engineering A team of researchers from Princeton University has built the first perovskite solar cells that last long enough to be commercially viable. Silicon-based cells, which many regard as an expensive and suboptimal component, have domin…
 
How were our stone age ancestors able to watch their own movies? Archaeologist Andy Needham joins us this week to tell us exactly why. We answer your questions on What is a turtle shell made of? And why are diamonds unbreakable? And we are joined by Professor Hallux and Nurse Nanobot, this week its all about your ears! An ancient croc is the topic …
 
Last week an engineer at Google claimed that an AI chatbot he worked with, known as LaMDA, had become ‘sentient’. Blake Lemoine published a transcript of his conversations with LaMDA that included responses about having feelings and fearing death. But could it really be conscious? AI researcher and author Kate Crawford speaks to Ian Sample about ho…
 
According to some estimates smoking causes one in 10 deaths worldwide. A lesser known side-effect of cigarettes is the damage they cause to our mental health. Yet, the rates of smoking among people with mental health conditions are much higher than the rest of the population. Last week, the UK government published the Khan review, an independent re…
 
News: Researchers run a gas turbine on pure hydrogen in world first | New Atlas (01:51) Gas turbines are found in aircraft, trains, ships, generators, pumps, compressors and all sorts of other places. 90% currently run on natural gas, which produces carbon dioxide when you burn it In the race to zero emissions by 2050, several organizations, includ…
 
What is sweat made of? Why did Pangea separate? In the news this week we hear about the worlds biggest plant, robotic hospitals and the food fight of the Megalodon. In Dangerous Dan it's all about the exploding carpenter ant and we are joined by Professor Hallux and Nurse Nanobot who tell us what happens in A&E and we learn all about the craters an…
 
When reports surfaced that Boris Johnson would be announcing the return of imperial measurements to mark the Queen’s platinum jubilee, there was some celebration, consternation, and a lot of confusion. Britain already uses a mix of both imperial and metric, and it is legal to price goods in pounds and ounces if this is displayed alongside the price…
 
Are synthetic chemicals we encounter every day causing us to gain weight? According to a major scientific review authored by dozens of scientists, there is now enough evidence to conclude that they are. Termed ‘obesogens’, these chemicals can be found in food packaging, personal hygiene products, electronics and even water. Madeleine Finlay speaks …
 
Scientists just broke the record for the highest efficiency solar cell | Interesting Engineering (01:46) A team of researchers at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has created a solar cell with a record efficiency of 39.5 percent. This is the highest efficiency solar cell of any type, measured using standard …
 
This year’s first podcast dedicated to COVID issues explores both caregiver and clinician satisfaction with telehealth. New studies explore this satisfaction with assessment as well as psychiatric interventions. Also, as a follow up to the INSAR presentations on resiliency in mental health, a new study from Canada explains what may be at the core o…
 
Scientists Gertrud and Angela join us this week to discuss their study on how Dolphins are using their own skincare in coral reefs and we answer your questions on why drinking glasses make music and what actually happens in a black hole! A dangerous stink is the subject of Dangerous Dan and we catch up with Professor Hallux and Nurse Nanobot, and t…
 
Bisexuality is the largest sexual minority in the world – but according to psychologist Dr Julia Shaw, it’s the least well understood. She talks to Madeleine Finlay about her new book, Bi, which challenges us to think more deeply about who we are and how we love. She discusses the history of trying to define and measure bisexuality, sexual behaviou…
 
A recent report on the exclusion of pregnant and breastfeeding women in clinical trials found that both women and babies in the UK are “dying needlessly” from a lack of suitable medications. Over the past 40 years, only two new medicines have been approved for use in pregnancy, leaving patients to weigh up unknown risks and make difficult decisions…
 
In this weeks Science Weekly we hear about a humungous hurricane season and why NASA are listening to Marsquakes. We also answer the questions Why is Water See-through and Why do We Yawn? In Dangerous Dan this week its about one of the fieriest and deadliest mushrooms around - he's not a fungi! We learn about broken bones with Professor Hallux and …
 
The sudden surge of monkeypox cases outside Africa has alarmed public health authorities around the world. In Europe and North America it’s the first time community transmission has been recorded among people with no links to west or central Africa. So what is happening? Ian Sample talks to virologist Oyewale Tomori about why monkeypox is flaring u…
 
Millions around the world are struggling with higher food and energy prices. In the UK inflation has reached a 40-year high of 9% in the 12 months to April, leaving many struggling to pay bills and shoulder normal living costs. When the weekly shop gets smaller and the flat gets colder, it’s our health that suffers. Madeleine Finlay speaks to healt…
 
This week, the #ASFpodcast explores different types of interventions for which the core autism features are not necessarily the target, but those that enhance quality of life and provide help for irritability and emotional dysregulation. They include cooking, music therapies and antipsychotic medications. While they may not be effective in core aut…
 
Explorer, paleoanthropologist and evolutionary biologist Ella Al-Shamahi joins us this week to chat about where we may see the earth in 7 years time and her defying new show Our Changing Planet! In Science in the News we hear about the Mars Rovers latest progress in its expedition and we answer your questions, this week we find out why we get sore …
 
From deep inside Gran Chaco, a dry tropical forest in Argentina one and a half times the size of California, comes a wake-up call for the world’s forests. We’ve lost more than a fifth of this incredibly biodiverse region since 1985. And it’s just one of many precious carbon-trapping ecosystems being lost to unrelenting deforestation. Six months ago…
 
Last November in Glasgow, countries agreed to limit the global temperature rise to 1.5C above pre-industrial averages. Six months on, the world has changed, with the war in Ukraine, high energy prices and the cost of living crisis threatening to derail us from achieving our climate goals. Ian Sample speaks to the Guardian’s environment corresponden…
 
At this year’s International Society of Autism Research meeting in Austin, TX, there was a variety of themes explored. From early development and milestones, to intervention and supports, to different features like sensory issues, treatment, and how to solve the problem of heterogeneity. It comes down to this: Autism means different things to diffe…
 
Brilliant Planet plans cheap, gigaton-scale carbon capture using algae | New Atlas (01:08) Direct air carbon capture is currently far too costly – but this London company, Brilliant Planet, says it can do it at enormous scale for a tenth the price, using engineered algal blooms in ponds located near desert coastlines Goals to de-acidify the ocean a…
 
Kevin Yates from the National Space Centre joins us to talk about a brand new gallery all about satellite data on Earth! In Science in the News we hear about a lucky 6 year old fossil hunter who found a 20 million year old shark tooth, and a fireball that was spotted over the UK! We answer your questions, this week we find out how we could survive …
 
It’s estimated that a million women in the UK could have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder – but according to the ADHD Foundation, 50–75% of them do not know they have it. Going without a diagnosis can impact someone’s education, employment and physical and mental health. So why are women being left behind? Madeleine Finlay speaks to Jasmine…
 
India and Pakistan have experienced their hottest April in 122 years. Temperatures are nearing 50C. Such extreme heat dries up water reservoirs, melts glaciers and damages crops. It’s also deadly. Ian Sample hears from Pakistan reporter Shah Meer Baloch about the situation on the ground, and speaks to Indian heat health expert Abhiyant Tiwari about…
 
Starlink's new Portability feature brings internet to vanlifers - The Verge (01:02) Starlink’s internet-from-SpaceX service has gone mobile with a new Portability feature. It costs an additional $25 each month, on top of monthly subscriptions that already start at $110 after a one-time hit of $599 to purchase the Starlink kit. Starlink subscribers …
 
This week is a pharmacopeia of inflation. The #ASFpodcast talks debilitating gastrointestinal issues and new efforts to understand and treat them (including the CANDID meeting www.candidgi.com), a new method to understand adverse events in those that cannot report them on their own, and new news on Celexa, which is used to treat anxiety. www.candid…
 
We hear all about the biggest triceratops ever found called Big John from Professor Ruggero Danastasio to chat about the incredible wounds this beast endured and what we can learn from this. In Science in the News we hear about no mow may and new information with the life expectancy of dogs.... can you guess which breed has the longest life expecta…
 
From hot flushes and flooding to memory problems and depression, for many the menopause can be both distressing and debilitating. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can alleviate some of these symptoms by boosting levels of hormones that wane as women get older. But the UK is experiencing an acute shortage of certain HRT products, leaving some witho…
 
The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has recently been switched back on after a three-year hiatus to resolve a mysterious and tantalising result from its previous run. So far, everything discovered at the LHC has agreed with the standard model, the guiding theory of particle physics that describes the building blocks of matter, and the forces that guide…
 
News From seawater to drinking water, with the push of a button | TechXPlore (01:04) MIT researchers have developed a portable desalination unit, weighing less than 10 kilograms, that can remove particles and salts to generate drinking water. Suitcase-sized device Requires less power to operate than a cell phone charger Can be powered by a small, p…
 
The amygdala has been shown to be differently sized in autistic people – at first it is too big then it becomes smaller than typically developing people. But how early are these differences seen and does it relate to a diagnosis? The Infant Brain Imaging Study tackled this question in a recent study which compared those who were likely to develop a…
 
The Urban Birder David Lindo joins us this week to chat all about the secret world of birds, and we learn the difference between a dove and a pigeon! (You'll never guess!) In Science In The News we find out about how we could be growing meat in space and why?! We answer your questions, this week we found out why whales blow up when they pass away o…
 
Over the past few weeks, countries around the world have reported an unexpected increase in the number of children with hepatitis. So far about 200 cases have been reported. More than half have come from the UK, but there have also been reports from Spain, Japan and the US, among others. Although this is still a very rare disease, it is severe, wit…
 
As the news came out of China that there was a new virus infecting humans, scientists around the world promptly got to work sequencing genomes, gathering data and communicating what they found with the public. One of the scientists catapulted into the public eye was Devi Sridhar, a professor in global public health. Soon, she was advising the Scott…
 
News: US Navy wirelessly beamed 1.6kW of power using microwaves | Interesting Engineering (01:22) New miniature heart could help speed heart disease cures | MedicalXPress (10:08) Ultra-light liquid hydrogen tanks promise to make jet fuel obsolete | New Atlas (16:20) Old skins cells reprogrammed to regain youthful function | Science Daily (23:15) Te…
 
In February, the CDC worked with the American Academy of Pediatrics to update the developmental milestones that parents should use when referencing how their child is developing. These milestones describe what should be accomplished by times as young as 2 months and as old as 5 months. These are helpful to all parents who wonder “shouldn’t my child…
 
Best selling author, scientist and philanthropist Lucy Hawking joins us this week to chat about climate change which is the subject of her brand new book, Princess Olivia Investigates the Wrong Weather. We hear about who has been named Champ of the Earth in Science in the News, and answer the question: Why Do We Sneeze? We also catch up with Profes…
 
This week, the US became the first country to ban anti-satellite missile tests, in an effort to protect Earth’s orbit from dangerous space debris. There could be millions of pieces of old satellites and spent rockets zooming around above our atmosphere, at speeds where collisions can be catastrophic. Guardian science editor Ian Sample talks to Prof…
 
While telling ghost stories has always been a favourite pastime for many, during the pandemic signs of paranormal activity have reportedly been on the rise. Madeleine Finlay speaks to Prof Chris French about why more of us may have been having eerie experiences, how to explain these phenomena scientifically, and why – even among nonbelievers – ghos…
 
Loading …

Οδηγός γρήγορης αναφοράς

Google login Twitter login Classic login